Hedgeriders, Soul Flight and a not-so-literal Brocken

 

The Flying Ointment Necklace, inspired by an old hedge-rider’s recipe.

Flying Ointment, the poisonous balm that aided witches in flight, has many recipes.  Modern ones might not get you there, as the most potent and potentially lethal ingredients will have been omitted.  In this necklace, however,  I’ve included three of the most dangerous.  Datura, henbane and nighshade are represented with Czech glass flowers and the  beautifully detailed little Queen stands in for the beeswax vehicle.   Soot is often mentioned as an ingredient– hence the black colourway of the piece.  I’ve included the skulls because if the recipes for flying ointment teach us anything, it’s that witches were skilled poisoners as well as herbalists, and the nuanced proportions of ingredients in the ointment could either aid in soul flight, alleviate the pain of childbirth or other woes through “twilight sleep”, or of course, kill you.

One of the oldest recorded accounts of the use of flying ointment is from the 2nd century in Apuleius’ delightful Golden Ass. There are also recipes mentioned in Margaret Murray’s exhaustive (and exhausting) Witch Cult in Western Europe, which modern day witches can only read critically, trying to decipher the truth through the lens of these “confessions” often elicited under torture. Much of the evidence we have left to us from our powerful female ancestors is weighted with such distortions.  Perhaps by flying ourselves to visit them, through soul-flight and meditation, we might know a better truth. Often witches are depicted flying in groups, communing– there are few solitaries where flight is concerned!  So were such ancestral Sabbats the ultimate destination of their night flights as well? Did they also meet with those who’d come before, not at a literal Brocken but somewhere else beyond this time and space?

This necklace was made to honour the hedge riders of the past who risked everything for wisdom and the healing of others.

Image of witches concocting flying ointment before the sabbat (Hans Baldung Grien, 1514) from PotShot

For a more in-depth treatment of this subject online, see Sarah Ann Lawless’ Blog.